2 out of 3 tech workers would leave SF permanently if they could work remotely – SFGate

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As remote work becomes an option, and city bars, shops and restaurants shutter their doors through the pandemic, some tech workers say they have no reason to stay in San Francisco.

As remote work becomes an option, and city bars, shops and…

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Life and work in the Bay Area may be changed forever.

An anonymous survey of 4,400 tech workers, conducted by Blind, found that two thirds of employees would consider leaving the Bay Area if they had the option to work remotely, as reported by Business Insider.

That option seems more and more likely as tech giants announce plans to let employees work remotely, indefinitely.

Last week Twitter's chief executive Jack Dorsey told employees that most workers would be allowed to work from home permanently, even after the coronavirus pandemic passes. Following the social media giant's disrupting move, Coinbase and Square made similar decisions. Google and Facebook soon joined suit although stopped short of an indefinite change, but foresee working-from-home as the norm until at least until 2021.

An office-centric culture may be a thing of the past, although salaries could be adjusted to account for reduced living costs away from the sky-high rents and real estate prices in San Francisco.

The sweeping changes may radically alter the way Americans work, after a century of office culture.

Even if workers do return to their downtown offices, the five-day work week may be a thing of the past. Respondents to the survey overwhelmingly said they didn't expect to go back into offices every day after the pandemic.

The change will be welcome to many who battle the complications of life in San Francisco, from a ultra-high cost of living to slow commutes. As city bars, shops and restaurants shutter their doors through the pandemic, some tech workers say they have no reason to stay. Meanwhile other regions such as Tahoe have seen an uptick in real estate interest.

Blind's survey dug into respondents' specific desires.

When asked if they would "consider relocating" if given the option to work remotely, 34% of Bay Area respondents said no. About 18% said they'd consider moving out of the Bay Area but staying in California, 36% said they'd consider moving elsewhere in the US and 16% said they could foresee leaving the country.

For the Business Insider story read here.

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Andrew Chamings is a digital editor at SFGATE. Email: Andrew.Chamings@sfgate.com | Twitter: @AndrewChamings

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